Entreprenuerial Lessons from Royal Bank Zimbabwe


The entrepreneurial journey is fraught with risk but can be very rewarding. Some lessons that can be learned from the Royal Bank case study are as follows:

1. Entrepreneurs take calculated risks. Mzwimbi did not use all his resources on the bank but left his shareholding in Econet intact. He also sought to diversify his wealth by keeping some investments with FML and Screen Litho. This has been the mainstay of his wealth creation strategy. The disaster that befell the bank did not completely wipe him out because of this prudent investment strategy.

2. Entrepreneurs learn from the experiences. Mzwimbi’s vast experience taught him critical lessons. His international banking experience enabled him to see the emerging trends as Barclays and Standard Chartered withdrew from country towns, creating a route for his entry strategy. His work with Econet taught him perseverance as he and his colleagues fought legal battles with government for the award of the licence. Little did he know that this was just training ground for the battle of his life – the battle for Royal Bank.

3. Entrepreneurs continuously scan the environment for threats and opportunities. Whereas Mzwimbi and his team were good at noticing the emerging positive trends in the environment at inception, they failed to pick the changes in the regulatory environment when the new governor came on board.

4. Entrepreneurial strategy emerges rather than follows a given plan and therefore entrepreneurs should be flexible. Although Royal Bank had a plan to grow at a steady pace, when the opportunity arose to acquire other branches cheaply the entrepreneurs seized the opportunity.

5. Entrepreneurs are faced with credibility challenges as customers, regulators and suppliers test the credibility of newcomers. Royal Bank minimised this by recruiting experienced and well known personnel in the market. However the lack of institutional shareholders led to credibility gaps with some corporate clients.

6. Entrepreneurs need to craft into their strategies both managerial and leadership competences to ensure both the ability to exploit opportunities (entrepreneurial activity) and sustainable company performance (strategic management). The more contemporary view of entrepreneurship transcends just the venture creation and now encompasses strategic growth. Although Mzwimbi was an excellent leader he needed a strong and powerful manager to consolidate the gains and create solid systems to sustain the rapid growth. Leaders thrive on change while managers thrive on handling complexity and creating order.

7. Business is built on relationships as these can help in scanning the environment e.g. critical information about opportunities and threats was obtained from close relationships
Let us close this with a few questions that an entrepreneur should consider. For instance, if Mzwimbi had expanded less aggressively, would Royal Bank have been safer from the regulators? How could Mzwimbi have protected Royal Bank from political and regulatory interference if he anticipated those risks? If Mzwimbi had selected to pursue his enterprise ideas in a country with a more dependable political and regulatory environment, how would he have performed? Would it have been wiser to keep the equipment, real estate and other assets in Royal Financial Holdings or other corporate entity and only lease them to the bank? In that scenario would the predators have been able to pounce on the bank?

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One thought on “Entreprenuerial Lessons from Royal Bank Zimbabwe”

  1. Thats the spirit many Zimbabwean entrepreneurs should have.Any entrepreneur is likely to face challenges along the way.Overcoming the challenges should be a priority.You are also completely right by saying that entrepreneurs need to craft into their strategies especially managerial and leadership skills the lack of which can lead to the demise of any business.

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