Jurisdictional Boundaries for Your Assignment


The exercise of every king’s authority is limited by the boundaries of his jurisdiction. As a priestly king you can only exercise your regal authority within certain boundaries that are prescribed by your life assignment and purpose.

Paul speaks to this in 2 Cor 10:13-15. “But we will not boast of things without our measure, but according to the measure of the rule which God has distributed to us, a measure to reach even to you. For we stretch not ourselves beyond our measure, as though we reached not to you: for we are come as far as to you also in preaching the gospel of Christ: Not boasting of things without our measure, that is, of other men’s labours…”

There are boundary lines that govern the scope of operation of every ministry gift. Paul speaks here of a definite region within which he had the right to operate legitimately. It is his jurisdiction. Can I propose that there are jurisdictional borders that govern your assignment? There are boundaries or limits that God assigns to your domain of influence and field of assignment. I am fully persuaded that God not only calls people to the ministry, but also specifies boundary lines that define their callings.  I have seen ministers or business people leave places where they were thriving and then go elsewhere and bomb out. God expects us to stay within the boundaries of our assignments and get the job done!

The measuring line that defines the jurisdiction of a priestly king’s activity is the commission God has given. The boundaries of your jurisdiction are determined by what God has called you to do. Your authority never goes beyond the boundaries of your God-given commission. Our sphere of influence is determined by the limits God has assigned to us. It is vitally important for priestly kings to know that they have a jurisdiction and to know what their jurisdiction is.

In the next few daily posts, we will consider a question a day that may help you zoom into an understanding of the boundaries of your calling and purpose.

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